Why is learning transfer so hard? - 96646

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Learning transfer refers to the degree to which an individual applies previously learned knowledge and skills to new situations. It is the primary reason for formal learning interventions—like courses, as well as informal interventions—explaining how to perform a task at a meeting. Near and Far Transfer All types of transfer are not equal. Near transfer occurs when a new situation resembles the situation in which the skill or knowledge was learned. When a technician learns to replace a motherboard in a desktop computer, this skill will be transferable to replacing other circuit boards in the computer. In near transfer, the application of prior learning is likely because the situations are similar. Near transfer knowledge is usually repetitive, such as tasks that reproduce a process or procedure. The more difficult type of transfer occurs when the learning situation and the new situation are dissimilar. This is known as far transfer, which may involve applying principles, implementing strategies and using judgement to solve problems. For example, after a manager attends a course on dealing with difficult employees, he or she may still not have the skills to handle certain unpredictable situations, such as workplace violence. Barriers to Learning Transfer Researchers who study learning transfer ...
Solution Description

Learning transfer refers to the degree to which an individual applies previously learned knowledge and skills to new situations. It is the primary reason for formal learning interventions—like courses, as well as informal interventions—explaining how to perform a task at a meeting.