COM 340 ~ WEEK 3 – DQ’s - 12261

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  • WEEK3-DQ#1: (DUE: Thursday, July 5th)Word Count 200-300 Word s

 

Commercial radio became the norm in the United States, whereas many other countries adopted a government-owned, non-commercial model used for education and culture. 

 

How would America be different today if the U.S. government owned and operated radio?

 

 

  • WEEK 3DQ#2: (DUE: Thursday, July 5th)Word Count 200-300 Word s

 

For decades, numerous social scientists, psychologists, and consumer groups have rallied against the negative images and ideas portrayed in motion pictures. The graphic depiction and “glamorization” of violence has been a major focus of those concerns.

Discuss the reliability of anecdotal evidence that movie violence causes violence in real life? What are some of your own thoughts and experiences in encountering violence and other negative images on the big screen? What effect did your family background and viewing habits have on your perceptions and attitudes about violence in movies? 

 

 

 

  • WEEK3-DQ#3: (DUE: Friday, July 6th)Word Count 200-300 Word s

 

Many early television programs, such as Milton Berle's Texaco Star Theater and The Lone Ranger came directly from radio. 

 

As television developed and the old radio favorites became visual, how did the family viewing experience differ? What effects did this have on family life? How has television viewing affected your own family life experiences and dynamics? 

 

 

Solution Description
  • WEEK3-DQ#1: (DUE: Thursday, July 5th)Word Count 200-300 Word s

 

Commercial radio became the norm in the United States, whereas many other countries adopted a government-owned, non-commercial model used for education and culture. 

 

How would America be different today if the U.S. government owned and operated radio?

ANSWER:

 

According to Rodman (2010), “At the other extreme, a third type of system, the libertarian system, calls for media to be privately owned and to be free of government control. A purely libertarian system, however, exists only in theory. The United States probably comes closest to this ideal, but because of the nature of broadcast media and the power of media in general, no country allows its media to be entirely unregulated. In fact, most countries have a mixed model. Although most U.S. media are privately owned, the government owns and operates several media outlets, such as the U.S. Government Printing Office, the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network, Radio Free Europe, and Radio Free China. The U.S. gove