Brain-Based Learning - 22118

Solution Posted by
fxyldyone

fxyldyone

Rating : (10)A
Solution Detail
Price: $10.00
  • From: ,
  • Posted on: Thu 08 Aug, 2013
  • Request id: None
  • Purchased: 1 time(s)
  • Average Rating: No rating
Request Description

In a brief essay (suggested length of 2 pages):

 

A.  Explain how students' prior experiences, interests, and thought processes can influence the learning of current content area concepts.

1.  Establish the link between past experiences, student interest, and present learning.

2.  Address each of the following key principles of brain-based learning:

•  Importance of meaningful learning

•  Knowledge background

•  Levels of processing

•  Development of neural connections

•  Relevance

•  Activating prior knowledge (schema theory)

 

B.  Explain why consideration of past experiences, learning, and student interests should be an important part of lesson planning for the teacher.

 

C.  Include specific examples from brain-based research to support your explanations. Use appropriate APA format for your in-text citations.

Solution Description

Brain-Based Learning

A student’s prior experiences, interests, and thought processes can influence the learning of current content area concepts.  A large body of findings shows that learning proceeds primarily from prior knowledge, and only secondarily from the presented materials. Prior knowledge can be at odds with the presented material, and consequently, learners will distort presented material. To help people make the most of a new experience, educators need to understand how prior knowledge affects learning.

Establishing a link between past experiences, student interest, and present learning is an important part of teaching.  Using these three factors in teaching lessons can make a difference in whether or not the student will learn and retain the lesson material.   It is much easier for students to deal with difficult situations and to persist with complex problems when the solution or question really matters to them.   When a student cares about what they are learning the more mental and physical reserves are then available to be applied to the learning.   The pedagogical implication is that what matters to a learner should be connected to curriculum when possible. 

There are several key principles of brain-based learning.  These key concepts are essential to educators of the future because good teaching required the teacher to understand how the brain receives, processes, and produces information.  As understanding of how the brain functions grows, new ways for learning will be addressed analytically.  The task is to think of the brain as an organ for learning and to match instruction to the way the brain gathers and retains